I’m Renewing my Troth Membership

I just got my summer issue of Idunna. I wish they wouldn’t sent these out so late. It’s already September! Oh well, I probably shouldn’t complain. I’m sure putting this thing together is a lot of work.

Inside my summer issue of Idunna is a notice that I need to renew my Troth membership. Last time I got one of these, I was very reluctant to renew. I had already unsubscribed from the Troth email list because it ticked me off too much.

The last straw with the Troth email list was the controversy when Hrafnar issued some kind of Black Lives Matter-supporting statement (which I think was triggered by something Crystal Blanton wrote on Pathos, but I’m not sure). A bunch of people in the Troth wanted to make it really, really clear that Hrafnar doesn’t speak for the whole Troth organization, and after reading through several emails on the list about how the black guys killed by the police probably deserved it, I unsubscribed.

And I was never much of a fan of Steven Abell, especially after that post to Patheos that went something like, “Sure Stephen McNallen is a white nationalist, but Ryan Smith is a smug jerk, so they’re equally bad!” That post didn’t surprise me much though, because I’d already read some of Abell’s personal blog posts and knew he was quite conservative. He felt it was very important to make sure the Troth and the AFA stayed on friendly terms, for some reason.

And I’ve never been to Trothmoot and may never go. They never hold it anywhere near where I live, and I’m not about to fly somewhere to spend a weekend with a bunch of people I’ve never met and am not sure if I’d get along with.

All I was really getting out of the Troth was Idunna. I enjoy reading at least half the stuff printed in there. There is interesting historical scholarship, UPG, recipes, John T. Mainer stories, all kinds of good stuff. I guess that’s a good example of the difference between the printed-on-paper word and the internet-posted word.

So last year I renewed my membership reluctantly, but didn’t put it on automatic renewal, because I wasn’t sure if I’d feel the same way in another year.

Well, a year’s gone by now I guess, and I do feel differently.

Now I’m definitely renewing my membership without hesitation!

Steven “All Lives Matter” Abell has stepped down as Steer, and in his place is Robert “Urglaawe” Lusch-Schriewer. Yay! He seems like a nice guy, and his work with Urglaawe is amazing.

(Also, I don’t really know who any of those other people on the High Rede are besides Mainer and Schriewer, but I like that it’s not all a bunch of white men. Is that a non-white person there? Cool!)

Since Mr. Schriewer has taken over, things have definitely changed. Most notably, they finally denounced the AFA! It’s about time! After all the racist stuff bigwigs in the AFA have been saying for years, the Troth finally denounced them when the AFA posted something about how we need to secure the existence of our people and a future for white children. OK, well, not exactly those words, but disturbingly close. Apparently to be a good Heathen you need to heterosexually humping like bunnies to produce as many white children as possible to prevent the extinction of the white race.

So finally, finally, everyone’s made a clear distinction between the Troth and the AFA. The AFA has made it clear that they are white nationalists with a pagan veneer (which I’ve already known all along), and the Troth has finally made it clear that we DO NOT associate with them.

So now I’m finally comfortable with associating with the Troth. No more frith-weaving between the Troth and the AFA! The Troth needs to now set itself apart as a clear alternative to the AFA for people who want to belong to a Heathen organization without ties or sympathies to the white nationalist movement.

(I’m still not putting it on automatic renewal, just in case this temporary and I’m getting my hopes up too much, but I really like this direction they’ve taken and hope they continue.)

My Ancestry.com DNA Test Results

I know very little about my ancestry. I know some families keep records of their family histories going back generations, but my family is just not that kind of family. More often, my family is the kind that doesn’t like to talk about (or to) other family members, living or dead, keeping secrets from each other and keeping those skeletons firmly in the closet. Otherwise that means we’d have to talk about the abuse, alcoholism, or mental illness that lurks in there, and we don’t want to talk about that.

But I think this is one of the reasons I was attracted to Heathenry. My lack of knowledge about my family history gives me a feeling of rootlessness, while Heathenry is all about connections through the Web of Wyrd to your ancestors, the land, the gods, and everything else.

When I was a kid I once asked my mom what nationality I was, and she told me I was half German, at least a quarter English, and the rest maybe some Scottish and French. I think this was based on the surnames of my ancestors going back only a couple of generations. My mom was born in Germany and moved to the United States as a small child. My dad was born in Oklahoma, but had an English surname, so he must have been of English descent. That’s all I knew. So getting into Heathenry I assumed I was mostly German and English and prioritized what scant information I could get on Anglo-Saxon and Continental German practices.

Most Heathens I know are very focused on Scandinavia and I have some friends who practice Irish paganism. That’s all great, but my mom was born in Germany, so I’m a German-American, right? So that’s the traditions I should focus on if I want to revive the spiritual practices of my ancestors.

Yet I was still curious about my ancestry, so when I heard DNA tests were now commercially available at an affordable price, I knew I wanted to do that. Since I only know the names of my grandparents and no further back than that, who knows what else could be lurking back there? My dad was from Oklahoma. There are a lot of Native Americans in Oklahoma. My dad had dark hair and difficulty growing much of a beard. Sometimes there was speculation there was Native American lurking back in his ancestry somewhere, which would have been really funny given how his parents were pretty racist. But who knows?

So I got a DNA test from Ancestry.com. All I had to do was spit in a vial, seal it in a special bag, send it in, and then wait a few weeks for them to do my tests and email me the results.

Here are my results:

Scandinavia 25%

Great Britain 23%

Europe West 16%

Ireland 14%

Italy/Greece 8%

Iberian Peninsula 6%

Europe East 4%

Finland/Northwest Russia 2%

European Jewish <1%

Caucasus <1%

Well, I’m all European, unless you count the Caucasus as Asian, even though “Caucasian” is used as a synonym for “white”. That region includes Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Iran, etc., which I think a lot of Americans would not consider to be white. That just goes to show how the whole American concept of whiteness is dubious.

As a scientist, I appreciate that Ancestry.com had a long explanation on their website about what these numbers actually mean and how many salt grains they should be taken with, though I’m sure most people taking this test will have no idea what it means, if they even bother to read that stuff at all. I just gave you the averages on my list above, but each of these ethnicities came with a range and error bars. Interestingly, of my four “dominant” regions, only Scandinavia and Ireland had error bars that didn’t include zero, which I guess means I definitely have at least a little DNA from those places, right? Great Britain and Europe West, the places I thought the majority of my ancestry was from, hand ranges of 0% – 51% and 0% – 43%, respectively (Scandinavia had 1% – 49% and Ireland had 1% – 28%).

Interestingly, by modern American standards, I’m “pure white”, but by the standards of my pre-Christian ancestors, I’m of mixed race. Until very recently, Irish people were considered a different race from English or Nordic people. I really wasn’t expecting to have Irish ancestry. Scandinavian wasn’t as surprising, just because those guys really got around, but I didn’t expect it to be at the top of my list. That’s where Western Europe was supposed to be.

After my main four regions, there’s Iberian and Italy/Greece. Perhaps I can blame the Romans for that. They really got around too. And then last I may have a few people from a little further East apparently, but that’s about it.

As for its implications for spiritual work, I guess it’s not so bad I’ve been borrowing from the Scandinavians after all, even though I feel like I have no cultural ties to Scandinavia. When I think of Scandinavian culture, if I want to get away from the Heathens who like to play Viking, all I’m really left with is Ikea and delicious meatballs and Abba. Not like there’s anything wrong with that. Abba had some catchy tunes.

Then there’s Ireland. That’s a very interesting place. I have several friends who are really into Ireland. They’re the sorts who really can trace their ancestry all the way back to whatever Irish clan they came from. Celts in general seem to be a very proud people, maybe because they have been historically oppressed. Ireland has some very interesting folklore and traditions, and then Irish-Americans continued with some very interesting traditions of their own. Maybe I need to take another look at Ireland.

But should I do what this guy in this commercial did, and “give up my lederhosen for a kilt?”

No, I still have fuzzy yet fond memories of my German immigrant grandmother, even though she died when I was only 4 years old. She was my only real tie to any sort of “old country,” with her thick accent and how she’d eat liverwurst straight out of the casing with a spoon. You have to be REALLY German to do that! She got me eating it, which now I realize is a really weird thing for a small child to eat, but I would always spread it on German rye bread from the German bakery to make a sandwich. I always liked bratwurst and sauerkraut when I was a kid too. Comfort food!

That kind of stuff matters. Nurture matters at least as much as nature, if not more. That’s why I think it’s OK for dark skinned people to be Heathens, especially if those dark-skinned people grew up in a country founded by European colonialism, which covers quite a lot of dark-skinned people, because like I said, my ancestors really got around.

So I’m going to keep being a German-American, if y’all don’t mind,

For the most part I don’t have anything cultural transmitted down to me by my European ancestors. No traditions or recipes or folklore or anything like that. I haven’t tried Ancestry.com’s family tree thing yet. I might go ahead and try it out it sometime, but with the scant knowledge I have of even people’s names or birth dates, I probably won’t get very far. Maybe it would have been different if my German grandmother hadn’t died so young, or my maternal grandfather hadn’t been such an abusive asshole, or I had a better relationship with my dad or his side of the family when he was alive. Those are the kinds of things that cut people off from their ancestors.

I just have my DNA to show that most of my ancestors even existed at all.